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Course Components

All Postgraduate Taught Courses


For information on which courses will be offered in the upcoming year, please refer to the list on the right.

Timetables for 2016:     Semester 1    Semester 2

Short descriptions for all our courses are listed below.

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses take the format of 12 two-hour seminars, once weekly, over the course of the relevant semester.  An "F" suffix denotes a first semester course.  An "S" suffix denotes a second semester course.


POL4002F  THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Dr K Smith.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course introduces students to some of the key theories in the study of International Relations and to the intellectual history of the field. The course also deepens students’ ability to read critically, and to think about real-world problems in an abstract way. The first part of the course offers an overview of the main theories and debates which constitute the field, and asks how they apply to international politics. The second part of the course explores the western-centric nature of IR as a discipline, and investigates the resultant problems in applying IR theory to the developing world, and Africa in particular.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: 4 short assignment (20%); long essay (40%); test (40%).


POL4005H  INTERNSHIP COMPONENT I

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Justice and Transformation Convener.

Entrance requirements: Admission to the Justice and Transformation Honours programme, and by permission of the Convener.

Objectives: To provide students practical experience of applying Justice and Transformation theories and concepts in a work environment To build practical skills relating to the application of Justice and Transformation including advocacy, public education, intervention and funding To provide a space to reflect on and develop an understanding of the practical challenges of promoting justice and transformation in South Africa.

Course outline: This course aims to provide students with practical experience of applying Justice and Transformation theories and concepts in a work environment, to build practical skills in advocacy, public education, intervention and funding, and to provide a space to reflect on the practical challenges of promoting justice and transformation. The course combines an internship in organisations working in the field with weekly reflective workshops. Workshops will draw on the experiences of the interns and on students’ previous work experience.  Seminars will be thematically organised and will involve some readings relating to practical skills.  Guest speakers from relevant NGOs will be drawn in to discuss particular themes.

Course Structure

  • 2 days per week internship for 4 months
  • 12 weekly workshops

DP requirements: Attendance as required by the approved organisation, completion of all written assignments.

Assessment: Two-page reflective notes on work experience and themes discussed in workshops.  This course is graded as Pass or Fail.  The outcome will be determined by the Convener/course lecturer after consultation with the organisation and assessment of written work.


POL4006F  PUBLIC POLICY

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Professor A Butler.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This first semester course explores academic research on the policy process and critically examines the central writings in the public policy literature. In addition, students investigate in comparative context the formulation and implementation of policy in contemporary South Africa, the operations of key departments of state, intergovernmental relations, and the power of organised interests in the policy process. Lectures introduce concepts, theories, and comparative materials, while student-led seminars address issues in contemporary South African public policy.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Test (40%); departmentalism paper (25%); essay (25%); participation (10%).


POL4012F  COMPARATIVE POLITICS

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Professor R Mattes.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: The aim of this seminar is to enable students to engage in the systematic comparative study of national political systems. Theoretically, the course introduces students to foundational conceptual approaches to comparative politics. Methodologically, the course introduces students to issues of research design and evidence that confront the systemic comparative study of national level political phenomena.

DP requirements: Completion of all presentations and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment requirements: Coursework 100% (which includes participation, seminar presentations, research project and a class test).


POL4013S COMPARATIVE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Dr V Naidoo.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course examines the emergence, evolution and contemporary debates surrounding the ‘comparative’ study of public bureaucracies, or Comparative Public Administration. This will include the emergence of an interest in comparing public bureaucracies globally, analytical approaches to and methodological challenges of comparative study, and reviewing the empirical record in comparative research.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment requirements: Coursework 70%, examination 30%.


POL4015F/S   LOCAL GOVERNMENT POLICY

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 8

Course convener:  Professor R Cameron.

Course outline: This course is an advanced study of local government. The first part of the course will look at some major theoretical debates such as the relation between democracy and decentralisation, public participation, intergovernmental relationships and local democracy. The second part of the course will be a detailed study of contemporary South African local government. Major debates such as metropolitan government, the role of traditional leaders and decentralisation will be examined.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment:  Coursework 70%, examination 30%.


POL4032F  COMPARATIVE TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Dr H Scanlon.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme. Relevant background studies in the areas of human rights, conflict and conflict-resolution, social and political theory.

Course format:  12 two-hour seminars, plus a series of separate weekly video screenings (number of sessions to be confirmed)

Course outline: This course explores the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) process in a comparative and critical perspective.  The TRC serves as an international model for unresolved conflicts in other parts of Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere.  The first part of the course provides an overview of the sub-field of transitional justice, locating it in relation to criminal and retributive justice as well as to social and restorative justice.  Part 2 considers the historical conditions for, and political implications of, the quest for justice and truth in the context of transitions from authoritarian rule with reference both to the aftermath of the second World War and the “third wave” of democratization from the 1980s.  Part 3 involves case studies including the Nuremburg Trial, the Latin American truth commissions and the South African TRC.  The final part of the course addresses moral and political debates around key issues of transitional justice.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: 3 response papers (30%) and seminar presentations (20%); OR default examination (50%); research essay (50%).


POL4033F  AFRICAN POLITICS

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Dr L Lushaba

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course aims to introduce students to the major forces shaping post-colonial African politics. A further objective is to assist students to understand what is now commonly referred to as the ‘African crisis’ and the prospects of overcoming the crisis. Africa’s crisis has generated a perception of the continent as a theatre of conflicts, destruction and underdevelopment. A related objective is to help students to develop critical insights into, and judgement on, the dominant debates and paradigms on Africa. Some of the themes to be addressed in the course include alternative approaches to the study of African politics, the political economy of colonialism and decolonisation, the state and governance in Africa, internal conflicts and reconstruction, civil society and democratisation and some aspects of Africa’s international relations, especially the continent’s growing relations with China.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment:  Coursework 50%; examination 50%.


POL4039F/S    PEACE OPERATIONS IN WORLD POLITICS

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Convener: to be confirmed

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course consists of a critical examination of efforts to create peace in world politics. We begin with an introductory survey of the field, including motivating figures and ideas, the history of peace and humanitarian operations by the United Nations, and the main frameworks used by scholars to analyse peace operations. The course next addresses the nature and problems of the major types of peace operations, including conflict prevention, humanitarian assistance and intervention, peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding. Where possible, cases and comparisons are drawn from Africa. Topics to be included are: scholarly approaches, the United Nations constitution and structure, humanitarian assistance, complex emergencies, peace enforcement, peacemaking, peacekeeping, peacebuilding and conflict prevention.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment:  Coursework 50%; examination 50%.


POL4044F   GLOBAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Convener:  Dr T Reddy

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course examines the history of political thought, mainly in the period from about 1850 to the present, in a global perspective. It locates the contest of political ideas in the context of Western global domination and resistance to it, tracing the sources of modern political ideas and the emergence of our contemporary global political vocabulary.

DP requirements: Completion of all essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: 3 assignments 45%, seminar presentation 15%, participation 10%, term paper 30%.


POL4048F/S  DIALECTICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener:  to be confirmed

Entrance requirements:  Admission to a relevant Honours or Master’s programme or by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: Dialectical political thought seeks to grasp the movement of contradictions in processes of historical change, as a method of transformative critique This course examines its ancient Greek background, uses of contradiction by thinkers such as Machiavelli and Rousseau, and the dialectical thought of Hegel and Marx. It provides a guide to the use of central concepts and methods of dialectical thought to enable students to make their own analyses of historical processes or current problems.

DP requirements: None.

Assessment: Three short essays (1500 words each; 10% of final mark x3 = 30%); one longer essay (4500 words; 30% of final mark); two-hour exam (40% of final mark).


POL4049F/S  COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Convener: Dr K Smith

Course entry requirements:  Admission to a relevant Honours or Master’s programme or by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course introduces students to the field of comparative foreign policy and seeks to answer several key questions: What are the foreign policy goals of states? How do they differ between states? How are these goals determined? What are the tools available to states? What are the outcomes? The theoretical frameworks will be applied to case studies of the foreign policies of China, The USA, Russia and South Africa.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Class participation (15%); weekly assignments (15%); final presentation & essay (20%); final examination (50%).


POL5001S COMPARATIVE POLITICS

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Conveners: Drs Z Jolobe and T Reddy

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This seminar in comparative politics within an African context is designed to acquaint students with important conceptual approaches, theories, methods, techniques, topics, case studies and debates in the field of comparative politics; to familiarize students with diverse methodological styles in this field; and finally, to develop critical reading and seminar participation skills.

DP requirements:  Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Participation, seminar presentations and research project 60%; examination 40%.


POL5005H  INTERNSHIP COMPONENT II

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Justice and Transformation.

Entrance requirements: Admission to the Justice and Transformation Master’s programme, and by permission of the Convener.

Objectives: To provide students practical experience of applying Justice and Transformation theories and concepts in a work environment To build practical skills relating to the application of Justice and Transformation including advocacy, public education, intervention and funding To provide a space to reflect on and develop an understanding of the practical challenges of promoting justice and transformation in South Africa.

Course outline: This course aims to provide students with practical experience of applying Justice and Transformation theories and concepts in a work environment, to build practical skills in advocacy, public education, intervention and funding, and to provide a space to reflect on the practical challenges of promoting justice and transformation. The course combines an internship in organisations working in the field with weekly reflective workshops. Workshops will draw on the experiences of the interns and on students’ previous work experience.  Seminars will be thematically organised and will involve some readings relating to practical skills.  Guest speakers from relevant NGOs will be drawn in to discuss particular themes.

Course Structure

  • 2 days per week internship for 4 months
  • 12 weekly workshops

DP requirements: Attendance as required by the approved organisation, completion of all written assignments.

Assessment: Two-page reflective notes on work experience and themes discussed in workshops.  This course is graded as Pass or Fail.  The outcome will be determined by the Convener/course lecturer after consultation with the organisation and assessment of written work.


POL5006F  PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Professor R Cameron.

Course lecturer: To be confirmed.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the management of the public sector environments, institutions, functions and processes. Students will be able to examine the macro-management of government in terms of the implementation of policies and programmes, as well as the micro-management of government by individuals and role-players. The course will incorporate and focus on contemporary South African public management issues, bureaucratic dysfunctions such as corruption, global public sector reform perspectives and new public management debates.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 70%; examination 30%.


POL5007S POLICY EVALUATION AND IMPLEMENTATION

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Dr V Naidoo.

Entrance requirements: Acceptance for an Honours or Master’s programme.

Prerequisite: POL4006F, or by permission of the course convener to eligible Honours or Master’s students.

Course outline: This course examines the implementation and evaluation components of the public policy process. The course will be grounded in a survey of the empirical research and theoretical arguments on implementation and evaluation, focusing on a critical assessment of their influence on the public policy process. This will be combined with reference to practical case examples of strategic, programme and project implementation and evaluation from South Africa and other countries.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 70%; examination 30%.


POL5019S PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM

NQF credits: 24 at level 8

Convener: Professor R Cameron.

Course entry requirements: POL5006F or by permission of the course convener to eligible Honours or Master’s students.

Course outline: This course introduces critical perspectives on selected issues of public sector reform.

DP requirements:  Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 70%; examination 30%.


POL5023S POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR AND RESEARCH

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Professor R Mattes.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: The aim of this course is to enable students to engage in the systematic study of individual political behaviour.  The course introduces students to research on how people develop attitudes and values, why they take part in various forms of political participation (such as voting, contacting, communing, and protesting), and how they interact with other citizens (interpersonal trust, intolerance, racism and xenophobia).  We focus on the questions political scientists ask, the data they collect, the research designs they use, and the political implications of their results.

DP requirements: Completion of all presentations and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 100% (which includes participation, seminar presentations and a major research project).


POL5026F  SPECIAL TOPICS I

(Offered in 2016 as "Special Topics I: Conflict in Africa")

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course conveners: Head of Department.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: Provision is made for an annual selected course on a topic of interest in Political Science, International Relations or Public Administration.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener. There may be a fieldwork component to the course.

Assessment: As determined by the course convener.


POL5027F  PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION THOUGHT

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Professor R Cameron.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: In South Africa, Public Administration is largely taught as an art. This unique course on Public Administration Thought attempts to move beyond this practical application and traces the intellectual evolution of the field as an academic discipline. The course aims to lay the foundation for Public Administration scholarship. It examines the major theories and concepts that underpin the field and also looks at the major thinkers in the discipline such as Wilson, Weber, Simon and Waldo. It exposes students to the contending approaches in the study of public administration and looks at the relationship between theory and practice.
The second part of the course argues that the 'nuts and bolts' approach to the subject has led to the intellectual crisis of Public Administration in South Africa. This has led not only to a paucity of knowledge-based research in the field but has also contributed to narrowly trained public servants with limited understanding of crucial Public Administration debates which inform practice.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 70%; examination 30%.


POL5029F/S   POLITICAL ETHICS

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 9

Convener: to be confirmed

Course entry requirements:  Admission to a relevant Honours or Master’s programme or by permission of the course convener.

Course outline:  This course traces the development of political ethics from the Greek city-state to the present, paying particular attention to the character of ethical problems in modernity. The theoretical framework developed from this study is used to clarify ethical problems and prospects in South African politics.

DP requirements: Completion of written work, as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Four short essays (1,500 words) and one longer essay (3,000 words) and active participation in the course.


POL5032F INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Dr H Stephan.

Entrance requirements: Previous studies in IPE or related subjects AND by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course provides a survey of the fundamental issues, concepts and literature that deal specifically with IPE theory. The course is based on the three main paradigms of International Political economy - mercantilism, liberalism and structuralism - and investigates the myth or reality of globalisation, regionalism and the role of the state in the globalisation process.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.  Participation is noted and counts towards the final mark.

Assessment: Participation and one major written paper 100%.


POL5034F/S   CONFLICT IN AFRICA

(Not offered in 2016 under this code - instead, it is being offered under code POL5026F)

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Convener: Professor A Seegers

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: In this course we examine conflict in sub-Saharan Africa. We are concerned with the following dimensions of conflict: the analysis of conflict; causes of conflict; actors in conflict; behaviour during conflict; consequences of conflict; and moral evaluation of conflict. In each dimension, we ask questions. To each of these questions, there are different, even opposing, answers. We examine these answers, illustrating them with cases and/or empirical material.

DP requirements:  Short assignments; seminar attendance; presentation; test and an essay.

Assessment requirements: Assessment is by coursework made up of a presentation (10%); test (40%); and essay (50%).


POL5035F DATA ANALYSIS IN POLITICAL SCIENCES

NQF credits: 12 at level 9.

Course convener: Professor R Mattes.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course format:  6 two-hour seminars; 6 two-hour lab sessions

Course outline: The aim of this course is to enable students to enable them to test hypotheses and answer research questions through the analysis of quantitative data.  The course will introduce students to computer assisted data analysis and cover basic methods of univariate, bivariate and multivariate statistical techniques.  Students attend a weekly two-hour seminar and a two-hour laboratory session over six weeks.  In the first session of each week, the instructor will cover the basic principles of a statistical technique, and in the second session students will execute those techniques on their own data.  This course is pitched at a basic introductory level and no prior statistical experience is required.

DP requirements: Completion of all presentations and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 100% (which includes participation, laboratory work, exercises and assignments).


POL5036S SPECIAL TOPICS II

(May not be offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Convener: Head of Department

Course entry requirements:  Admission to a relevant Honours or Master’s programme or by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: Provision is made for an annual selected course on a topic of interest in Political Science, International Relations or Public Administration.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: As determined by the course convener.


POL5037S POST-CONFLICT JUSTICE IN AFRICA

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Head of Department.

Entrance requirements: Admission to Honours / Master’s in Justice & Transformation or International Relations.

Course outline: This course examines the role of empirical research in building knowledge of post-conflict reconciliation and transitional justice, and introduces students to research methodologies and their application.  The first part of the course explores the role of research and the present state of knowledge in the field. Part two critically engages with conceptual frameworks in post-conflict reconciliation and transitional justice, and explores how these have been operationalised in empirical studies. Part three examines methodologies that have been employed in TJ research, especially in the African context..  The fourth part reflects on the ethics and politics of TJ research and assesses the relationship between the researcher and the researched and the impact of research funding on what questions are being asked. The course will cover a wide range of qualitative and quantitative approaches and offer an opportunity to explore some of these more deeply.  We will draw on published research that has been conducted  around the globe, including in South Africa, Uganda, Rwanda, Afghanistan, Nepal, Northern Ireland, Chile, Peru, and elsewhere.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment requirements: Conceptual/methodology summary (20%), article critique (20%), group research project (40%); research proposal (20%).


POL5041F/S   HISTORY OF SA POLITICAL THOUGHT

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Convener: Associate Professor A Nash

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course examines selected periods and problems in South African political thought, roughly from 1895 to the present, in sufficient depth to give students an understanding of the main problems of evidence, interpretation and narrative craft, and enable them to develop relevant skills in dealing with them. Initially, the course will focus on the thought of Olive Schreiner, Nelson Mandela and Steve Biko. This focus may shift in subsequent years, depending partly on student interests. The course requires extensive reading of a range of primary sources.

DP requirements: None

Assessment: Three short essays of 2000 words each (45%); longer research paper of 6000 words (45%); course participation (10%)..


POL5042F   PEACEBUILDING: ISSUES & PROBLEMS

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Convener: G Lamb / Head of Department

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course will consider the concepts and theories of peacebuilding, as well as how it has been applied (mainly in post-conflict settings). The specific focal areas of the course will be: UN’s approach peacebuilding; post-conflict economy; armed violence; arms control and disarmament; the demobilisation and reintegration of combatants into civilian life; security sector reform; refugees and the diaspora; youth violence; policing; civil society and peacebuilding; as well as information communication technology and peacebuilding.

DP requirements:  Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: A minimum of five assignments of 2500 words each (50%); one course paper of 6000-8000 words (50%).


POL5043F  REGIONALISM IN AFRICA

(Not offered in 2016)

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Associate Professor J Akokpari.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Masters programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course aims at equipping students with the skills and knowledge to analyse regional economic formations in Africa, thereby enhancing their understanding of regionalist impulses on the continent. It proceeds on the premise that regional integration has become a key feature of Africa’s political economy and as a viable route to the continent’s development. Thus since the independence decade of the 1960s, various regional blocs have emerged in Africa. The course examines the emergence, performances and, in some cases, the demise of regional organisations in Africa. The regional blocs to be studied in the course include the OAU and AU, ECOWAS, SADC, and the revived East African Community. A further objective is to analyse the prospects of these regional bodies under globalisation. The first two lectures will be devoted to introducing students to the broader theories of regionalism.

DP requirements: Students must satisfy all course requirements – course attendance, presentation, weekly assignments, and a major semester paper.

Assessment: Response papers (30%), class presentation (20%), term paper (30%), class test (20%).


POL5044S  SOUTH AFRICAN POLITICS

HEQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Course convener: Professor A Butler

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme and permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This advanced course explores South African politics through a variety of historical, theoretical and comparative lenses. The early weeks of the course draw on historical, sociological, and other materials to investigate the 20th century political history of the country. Students will address conflicts that have unfolded between traditional, liberal, popular and quasi-Marxist conceptions of how a society ought to be governed. The middle sections of the course investigate the causes, significance, and implications of the ‘democratic transition’ using a diversity of scholarly resources. In the final sections, students will explore some key issues in South Africa’s contemporary political life. They will focus on the party system; the nature of the post-apartheid state; the relationships between party, state and business; contests over the meaning of democracy; and the changing character of the ANC. There will be a core of essential readings. Beyond these, however, the course will be centred around student-led, independently researched, seminars and discussions.

DP requirements: Completion of all written tests, essays and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Two long essays (30% each); test (30%); and a  student presentation (10%).


POL5045S   THIRD WORLD POLITICS

NQF credits: 24 at level 9.

Convener: Dr L Paremoer

Course entry requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course critically evaluates prominent discourses about development, modernity, independence and solidarity in the Third World. We will address the following questions: How and why did the Enlightenment and the processes of colonialism and imperialism give rise to the idea of the Third World? What, if anything, was distinctive about the characteristics and ambitions of the Third World governments in comparison to other blocs in the international community of sovereign nation-states? Which power relations associated with the “West”, “First World” or “Second World” did Third World elites critique, and which power relations did they try to replicate in their own states after attaining independence? What are the prospects for producing scholarship on the Third World that is critical, reliable, embedded in the experiences of Third World peoples, original and transformative?

DP requirements:  Completion of all written work as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Three response papers (15% each); term paper (55%)


POL5046S DEMOCRATISATION

NQF credits: 24 at level 8.

Course convener: Professor R Mattes.

Entrance requirements: Admission to an Honours or Master’s programme, and by permission of the course convener.

Course outline: This course provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in political science about one of the great issues of our day, the worldwide spread of democracy.  We focus on four central questions.  How do countries become democracies (with particular emphasis on the "Third Wave" of democracy that has swept the world since 1974)?  How do countries maintain democracy?  What are the consequences of democracy?   And how can we best measure and evaluate democracy?

DP requirements: Completion of all presentations and/or assignments as stipulated by the course convener.

Assessment: Coursework 100% (which includes participation, seminar presentations, research project and a class test).